BharatMatrimony Search
FemaleMale
Age   to 
With Photo
   Regular Search
   More Search Options








Hyderabad city with a past


2 Votes | Average: 4.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 4.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 4.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 4.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 4.5 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 4.5 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The advantages of honeymooning in a big metro are manifold; it is possible to have a flexible and delightful mix of shopping, sightseeing, partying, disco dancing, yet quickly retreat to the quiet confines of the four walls of the hotel room.

The age or heredity of a city is not necessarily a criterion for selecting a honeymoon location; it is always reassuring to know that a ‘right’ choice has been made. Choosing Hyderabad can never go wrong because unlike most southern cities founded or developed due to the exigencies of the East India Company, it existed long before the British established their trading posts.

According to historians the Hussain Sagar Lake was built as far back as 1562 AD and it is on it’s banks that Hyderabad was founded in1589 AD. Hyderabad has a romantic story behind its birth. Mohammed Quli Qutub Shah, the 5th King of Golconda, founded this city for the sake of his lover Bhagmathi, closely followed in 1591 by the city’s most visible landmark- the Char Minar. However, it was only in 1769 AD that the then ruler Nizam Ali Khan Asif Jha shifted the capital to Hyderabad. The twin city of Secunderabad was founded much later in 1806 -to that extent they are not really twins, but are situated on opposite banks of the Hussain Sagar Lake. Hyderabad is rated the fifth largest metropolis of India.

The advantages of honeymooning in a big metro are manifold; it is possible to have a flexible and delightful mix of shopping, sightseeing, partying, disco dancing, yet quickly retreat to the quiet confines of the four walls of the hotel room. The city of Hyderabad is famous for its breathtaking monuments, mosques, temples, a rich and varied heritage in arts, crafts and dance. The best pearls in India are found here and it is also the place the Kohinoor diamond originated. Hyderabad is where Sir Ronald Ross discovered the malaria parasite, in 1897.

Char Minar
Towering triumphantly in the heart of the old city, swamped by bazaars buzzing with activity, this huge arch was built by Muhammad Quli Qutab Shah. It is the brand image of a popular cigarette, and is reproduced on every packet. Though the monument is now permanently closed to the public, it merits a visit - at least an autorickshaw ride around the perimeter.

Golconda Fort
Golconda Fort, the historic 400-year-old monument, 28 kilometers to the West of Hyderabad - impresses with its rich cultural heritage. Built by Mohammed Quli Qutub Shah in 1525, it reflects both the opulent Nawabi culture and Moghul influences. The impregnable fort was of strategic importance to many dynasties. In 1518, when the Qutub Shahi dynasty was established, Golconda became its capital. The origins of the fort can be traced back to the Kakatiyas period when Golconda was originally a mud fort, which passed to the Bahmani dynasty and later to the Qutb Shahis, who held it from 1518 to 1687.The first three Qutb Shahi kings rebuilt Golconda over a span of 62 years.

Subsequent generations saw the formation of a beautiful city within. The fort is famous for its acoustic system and the Fateh Rahben gun, one of the cannons used in the siege of Golconda by Aurangzeb, to whom the fort ultimately fell in 1687. By the 17th century, Golconda was famous as a Diamond Market. It gave the world some of the best-known diamonds, including Kohinoor.

The road up to the fort once a thriving market for carpets and diamonds is now deserted. It leads to a colossal gate, its exterior studded with long iron spikes. Past the gate, lies the remarkable portico known as the Balahisar Gate. Also worth seeing are the Royal Nagina Gardens, the Bodyguards’ Barracks, and the three water tanks, which formed part of an intricate water system. The high point of the Fort the Durbar Hall, nests atop a hill overlooking Hyderabad and Secunderabad. It is accessed by a 1000-step stairway, and if you make the climb, you will be rewarded with a great view of the two cities and the famous Charminar, on a clear day. Close to the fort, about a kilometer to the north, are the beautiful domed tombs, the Qutub Shahi royalty built according to Islamic architecture. An attraction worth watching is the sound and light show that brings the legend of Golconda to life. The show is presented in English and Telugu on alternate days.

Salarjung Museum
Dating back to the 1st century, the collections in this museum belong to different civilisations; they were collected by Nawab Mir Yusuf Ali Khan Salarjung III, the Prime Minister to Nawab Mir Osman Ali Khan, Nizam VII, the ruler of Hyderabad. It is also one of the single largest one-man collections of the world and makes the city of Hyderabad more famous. One of the most memorable galleries is the room that houses more than 300 clocks ranging from ancient Sandiaers in the form of obelisks to modern huge pieces from the 19th and 20th century. They vary in size, material and shape, from the tiny pieces set in magnifying glasses to huge and stately grandfather clocks from France, England, Germany, Italy and Switzerland. One such musical clock by Cook and Kelvy of England draws big crowds. It is a mechanical wonder - the toy figure of a watchman pushes open a door, to emerge hour after hour and strike the melodious gong to indicate the time. The coins “Hali Sicca” minted in 1858 are also on display here.

Other places of interest
Mecca Masjid (1687), Purani Haveli, Falaknuma Palace, Hyderabad Medical School (1864), and Birla Temple.

    Bookmark Hyderabad city with a past at del.icio.us    Digg Hyderabad city with a past at Digg.com    Bookmark Hyderabad city with a past at blogmarks    Bookmark Hyderabad city with a past at YahooMyWeb     Add to Onlywire

Responses to Hyderabad city with a past

  1. No Comments

Did you like reading this? Give us your feedback. Post your comments here.

Quicktags: