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5 Steps to Defining your Dream Partner


3 Votes | Average: 4.67 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.67 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.67 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.67 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.67 out of 5 (3 votes, average: 4.67 out of 5)
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Dream partnerFinding the right one when it comes to partners isn’t easy, but what usually complicates the situation is that you aren’t really sure what the ‘right one’ is like. If you don’t have a focused idea of the kind of partner you’re looking for, you aren’t likely to recognize them even if you fell over their feet in the coffee shop.

Defining your dream partner isn’t about setting an ingredients list in stone, but rather thinking about the sort of person your ideal partner would be, creating a mental check-list so that you don’t spend a lot of time dating people who fall a long way from that list. Take a look at the following steps and see how easy it is to define your dream partner.

Step 1: What’s the most important attribute that your dream partner must have. Unlike the other attributes you will put on your list, this is the one unshakable thing that your partner has to have. The idea here is that this is going to be something important to you and it will help you to immediately narrow your search down to only the potential partners who have this personality trait or physical characteristic. Remember, this is something that is un-negotiable - something such as a ‘non-smoker’ or even someone who does smoke, or someone who doesn’t have a prison record, or isn’t allergic to cats, or think even deeper than this, the person you are looking for must like and want children (or not!).

Man and the magical formula of work-life balance


3 Votes | Average: 4.33 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.33 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.33 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.33 out of 53 Votes | Average: 4.33 out of 5 (3 votes, average: 4.33 out of 5)
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Work-life balanceToday’s young people have it all. And that too at an age that gives them the luxury of a lifetime to enjoy what they possess. So, the  result should logically be a set of absolutely jubilant people living life to the lees. But, unfortunately, it is not so.

More and more young people are experiencing the “burn out” syndrome. Divorce rates are on the rise. Global economy, international businesses, advanced communication technology and longer hours (or should we say on the job 24/7) are beginning to take their toll on people’s lives and people are struggling to find the magic mantra that will help them strike a balance between a successful career and a happy and contented family life.

Rahul is a banker and his wife Nisha is a teacher. According to Rahul, “ Nisha is very understanding. There are times when I see her only at the breakfast table. But, she never complains. Except for the occasional wifely croons (which I guess is fine). And we make up for lost time by pampering ourselves with short getaways now and then. And I don’t think our marriage is on the rocks.” Nisha somewhat reluctantly agrees. But, she does not forget to add, “I understand that nowadays people are on the job 24/7. And yes holidays together make up somewhat but, one cannot know importance of your loved one actually “being there” for you all the time and not only when he has enough time to spare so that he can go on holiday!”

Independence Day Getting Later for Today’s Teens


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Today's TeensThe definition of “independence” is different for the 18-year-olds of today. Fact is, fewer work or go on to college right out of high school. More remain dependent on Mom and Dad, who house and support them for longer than parents have done so in the past. Independence day for these kids seems to be coming later and later in life.

These kids aren’t all selfish, immature, and overly-dependent. This is a generation that seems to be taking longer to grow up, and doesn’t mind living off of Mom and Dad for as long as they are able. Somewhere yesteryear generation — where we couldn’t wait to get out of our parent’s house — and this generation that seems content to remain at home, there’s been a definite shift in what kids consider to be “independence.”

The Power of Thankfulness


2 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.5 out of 5)
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Power of ThankfulnessThere is one sure fire medicine which cures all pain and opens the way for your greater good. It allows you to sleep well at night, wake up refreshed and filled with enthusiasm for your daily tasks and ongoing relationships. This medicine is abundantly available, has no side effects and can be taken in large or small doses regularly. You need no one to prescribe it. The more you take, the sweeter it is.

The medicine is the practice of thankfulness. Although there are endless cures for anxiety, one thing is impossible - to be upset and grateful at the same time.

When we take thankfulness on as a practice, we see that it is more than a fleeting feeling; instead it becomes a daily practice, a basic way of life. In fact, no matter what we are feeling, we can always perform deeds of thanks; actions that express our gratitude and awareness of the good we constantly receive. Actually, when we perform these actions, our feelings often turn themselves around.

Teens and Self-control


2 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 52 Votes | Average: 3.5 out of 5 (2 votes, average: 3.5 out of 5)
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TeensParenting teens is not just about caring for their physical and educational needs. It’s also about training your teen to handle what life will later dish out, with body and soul intact. It’s about teaching self-control.

After all, your child will spend 80% of his lifetime away from you.  So, you need to ask yourself this question: “Am I willing to relinquish control to my teenager before he leaves home in order to help him learn how to act and become the one God desires him to be?”

Teens gradually need to get their feet wet in decision-making, since one day soon they will be fully in control of their own life and self-control will be paramount. Your main goal, then, should be about preparation for making good life decisions. It’s more than teaching how to handle the finances, or how to pick the best classes, or driving responsibly. It’s about training them to be godly men or women and developing their character.